confirm


confirm
confirm 1 *ratify
Analogous words: *assent, consent, acquiesce, accede, subscribe: validate (see CONFIRM 2): sanction, *approve, endorse
Contrasted words: reject, refuse, *decline
2 Confirm, corroborate, substantiate, verify, authenticate, validate mean to attest to the truth, genuineness, accuracy, or validity of something. Confirm and corroborate are both used in reference to something doubtful or not yet proved.
Confirm, however, usually implies the resolving of all doubts typically by an authoritative statement or by indisputable facts
{

his failure to pay his debts confirmed their suspicion that he was not to be trusted

}
{

there is a rumor—which cannot of course be confirmedGorrell

}
{

it was expectation exquisitely gratified, superabundantly confirmedHenry James

}
Corroborate suggests particularly the strengthening of one statement or piece of evidence by another
{

the bystanders corroborated his story

}
{

in general the material illustrates and corroborates what has already become known from other sources— Kennan

}
Substantiate presupposes something needing to be demonstrated or proved and implies the offering of evidence sufficient to sustain the contention or to create a strong presumption in its favor
{

they were able to substantiate their claim to the property when the long-lost deed was found

}
{

Darwin spent nearly a lifetime in gathering evidence to substantiate his theory of the origin of species

}
{

no proof had to be brought forward to substantiate the claims they made— Anderson

}
Verify has for its distinctive implication the established correspondence of the actual facts or details to those that are given in an account or statement. When what is in question is a suspicion, a fear, or a probability, it can be verified only in the result, event, or fulfillment
{

the prediction of a severe storm was verified in every detail

}
{

it [faith] begins as a resolution to stand or fall by the noblest hypothesis . . . ; but it is verified progressively as we go on— Inge

}
In more general use verify implies a deliberate effort to establish the accuracy or truth of something usually by comparison (as with ascertainable facts, an original, or a series of control experiments)
{

verify all the citations in a book

}
{

statements of accounts due are not sent out until they are verified

}
{

the careful scientist verifies every step in an experiment

}
{

he has explored most of Trans-Jordan, verified biblical accounts by his findings and excavations— Current Biog.

}
{

a government survey party was verifying the neighboring landmarks— Furphy

}
Authenticate presupposes question of a thing's genuineness or validity and therefore implies a demonstration of either of these by someone (as an expert or the proper authority) in a position to know or to determine
{

the collector refused to purchase the manuscript until it had been authenticated by experts

}
{

the bank authenticated the signatures on the note

}
{

an authenticated copy of the Declaration— Dumas Malone

}
Validate is more often used than authenticate when applied to legal papers requiring an official signature or seal before becoming valid
{

validate a passport

}
It is, however, also used when the soundness of a judgment, of a belief, or of a policy is in question
{

the expansion of demand which alone can validate the policy— Hobsori

}
{

he validated his conclusion when he demonstrated that his facts and his reasoning were correct in every detail

}
Analogous words: *support, uphold, back: vouch, attest, *certify
Antonyms: deny: contradict
Contrasted words: gainsay, traverse, impugn, contravene, negative (see DENY): confute, refute, controvert, *disprove

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • confirm — con·firm vt 1 a: to make valid by necessary formal approval the debtor s chapter 13 plan confirm ed by the court b: to vote approval of confirm a nomination 2: to give formal acknowledgment of receipt of 3 …   Law dictionary

  • confirm — con‧firm [kənˈfɜːm ǁ fɜːrm] verb [transitive] 1. to say or show that something is definitely true: • The company said the report confirmed what its own directors and accountants had already established. confirm that • Walsh confirmed that the… …   Financial and business terms

  • Confirm — Con*firm , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Confrmed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Confirming}.] [OE. confermen, confirmen, OF. confermer, F. confirmer, fr. L. confirmare; con + firmare to make firm, fr. firmus firm. See {Firm}.] 1. To make firm or firmer; to add… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • confirm — [kən fʉrm′] vt. [ME confermen < OFr confermer < L confirmare < com , intens. + firmare, to strengthen < firmus, FIRM1] 1. to make firm; strengthen; establish; encourage 2. to make valid by formal approval; ratify 3. to prove the truth …   English World dictionary

  • confirm — [v1] ratify, validate, prove affirm, approve, attest, authenticate, back, bear out, bless, buy, certify, check, check out, circumstantiate, corroborate, debunk, double check, endorse, establish, explain, give green light*, give high sign*, give… …   New thesaurus

  • confirm — ► VERB 1) establish the truth or correctness of. 2) state with assurance that something is true. 3) make definite or formally valid. 4) (confirm in) reinforce (someone) in (an opinion or feeling). 5) (usu. be confirmed) administer the religious… …   English terms dictionary

  • confirm — mid 13c., confirmyn to ratify, from O.Fr. confermer (13c., Mod.Fr. confirmer) strengthen, establish, consolidate; affirm by proof or evidence; anoint (a king), from L. confirmare make firm, strengthen, establish, from com , intensive prefix (see… …   Etymology dictionary

  • confirm — con|firm W2S2 [kənˈfə:m US ə:rm] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: confirmer, from Latin confirmare, from com ( COM ) + firmare to make firm ] 1.) to show that something is definitely true, especially by providing more proof ▪ New… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • confirm */*/*/ — UK [kənˈfɜː(r)m] / US [kənˈfɜrm] verb Word forms confirm : present tense I/you/we/they confirm he/she/it confirms present participle confirming past tense confirmed past participle confirmed 1) [transitive] to prove that something is true The… …   English dictionary

  • confirm — con|firm [ kən fɜrm ] verb *** 1. ) transitive to prove that something is true: The study confirms the findings of earlier research. Please bring something with you that confirms your identity. confirm (that): The doctor may run a test to confirm …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.